Hazards Associated with Hydroplaning

Hazards Associated with Hydroplaning Wet weather season is upon us, and it is wise to review how to safely navigate inclement weather conditions. Wet weather can make air travel precarious both in the air and on the ground—during takeoffs and landings. In this article, we will address the types of hydroplanes, their causes, and how to avoid them. The three basic types of hydroplaning are: Dynami...
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Hazards Associated with Microbursts

Summer is here, and although there will be plenty of perfect flying days, pilots should be prepared for volatile weather, such as thunderstorms, which can pop up quickly and unexpectedly. While there are many hazards associated with thunderstorms, this article specifically addresses microbursts. Formation When a thunderstorm develops, the updraft can be so strong that it suspends large a...
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The National Weather Service Marks its Sesquicentennial

The National Weather Service (NWS) is one of the primary sources for weather information used by pilots and dispatchers to plan and monitor flights. Weather information is a fundamental element in the lives of aviators, and has been since the first aviators took to the skies. The NWS we know today was originally called the Weather Bureau, created by President Ulysses S. Grant in 1870, 33 years bef...
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